Skip to content

Red Snapper

by Teichenné

Products

G39 LEVEL Gin Reserve_Front View

Level Gin Premium

Author

09_AlbertoPizarro_300x345

Alberto Pizarro

Red Snapper Teichenné

Description

Red Snapper cocktail variant of the Bloody Mary. It was in 1934 when bartender Fernand Petiot introduced the “Red Snapper”. Serge Obolensky, a well-known man about town whose penchant for vodka was in keeping with his aristocratic Russian background, asked Petiot to make the vodka cocktail he had in Paris. As vodka was not very “available” in the United States, it was replaced by gin. The formula was spiced up with salt, pepper, lemon and Worcestershire Sauce, but since “Bloody Mary” was deemed too vulgar for the hotel’s elegant King Cole Bar, it was rechristened the Red Snapper cocktail.

*Worcestershire: Worcestershire sauce, frequently shortened to Worcester sauce, is a fermented liquid condiment of complex mixture originally created by the Worcester chemists John Wheeley Lea and William Henry Perrins, who went on to form the company Lea & Perrins. The ingredients are allowed to mature for 18 months before being blended and bottled in Worcester, where the exact recipe is kept a secret. It is made with vinegar, molasses, corn syrup, water, chili peppers or paprika, soy sauce, tamarind, anchovies, onions, shallots, wine (occasionally), cloves and garlic. It is considered a flavor enhancer used in various dishes, both cooked and raw, and in English cooking it is applied to beef.

Ingredients

6cl Level Gin Premium
12cl tomato juice
1.5cl lemon juice
1 dash of *Worcestershire sauce
2-4 drops of Tabasco
1 bit of salt
1 pinch of black pepper

Preparation

Mix all the ingredients in a glass with ice. Stir and serve it in a long “highball” glass, with a bit of celery. We add our personality with a bit of rosemary and a couple of green olives. A great cocktail to enjoy as an appetiser.

Other recipes using Level Gin

Level Gin

Secret de Beijing

by Vicenç Mora

Level Gin

Buttermint Toffee

by Pepe Orts

Level Gin

Apple Martini